Freshman Seminars Fall 2000

SECTOR I: SOCIETY

African Worlds
Sandra Barnes, Professor of Anthropology
This course concentrates on popular culture in sub-Saharan Africa. It examines the way people reflect on and represent various aspects and issues in their daily lives, in public media and through a diverse range of performative and creative outlets. It explores the way cultural traditions are created, promulgated and perpetuated. It looks at the way popular culture deals with pleasure and pain; identity, difference and diversity; wealth and power; modernity and history; gender relations; suppression, resistance and violence; and local versus global processes. In short, popular culture will serve as a window through which to observe contemporary life. (Distribution)
ANTH 018.401 or AFST 018.401, Tuesday, 1:30 - 4:30

lndia: Ancient and Modern
Gregory Possehl, Professor of Anthropology
This course is intended to be an introduction to the anthropological study of South Asia. It will cover archaeology, physical anthropology, cultural anthropology and linguistics, along with excursions into geography, the Indian census and gazetteers. A second focus of the class will be an investigation of the origins of the caste system. Each student will be expected to complete a significant research paper related to the class, along with one class presentation. This is a WATU course and one of the class meetings each week will be devoted to writing. The grade for the course will be based upon the instructor's evaluation of each of these exercises. (Distribution)
ANTH 024.401 or SARS 024.401, Monday, Wednesday & Friday, 10:00- ll:00

Sex and Gender in Ancient Greek Culture
Sheila Murnaghan, Associate Professor of Classical Studies
An interdisciplinary study of ancient Greek attitudes to gender as reflected in the legal, social and religious roles of women; conceptions of the family and its place in the city; biological and evolutionary speculation about sexual difference; the representation of sexuality and gender relations in mythology, lyric poetry and drama. (Distribution)
CLST 121.401 or WSTD 120.401, Tuesday Thursday, 10:30- 12:OO

Identity, Intimacy, Maturity
Vivian C. Seltzer, Professor of Human Development and Behavior
Psychological development is ongoing throughout life. Specific age periods are defined as critical periods of development when psychological identity is either resolved or remains unfulfilled as a result of premature closure or identity diffusion. Identity, intimacy and maturity are related concepts, independent but intertwined. A full identity reinforces psychological readiness for intimacy (which may or may not be accompanied by physical intimacy). Possession of identity and the ability it brings to engage in intimate relations profoundly affects attainment of psychosocial maturity.
This course examines both the process and content of critical areas of psychosocial functioning. Both the idiosyncratic nature and the interrelated dimensions of each of the three periods are examined as are definitions, positive and/or negative contributing forces, manifestations, irregularities and so forth.
Readings introduce the theoretical framework that underpins the three core concepts. Class seminars present their theoretical linkages and raise further issues; class projects and assignments allow for pragmatic analyses. (Distribution)
FRSM 104.301, Tuesday, 1:00—4:00

Dilemmas in International Development
Richard Estes, Professor, School of Social Work
Students will be exposed to the interplay of international forces that inhibit the progress of developing nations and can actually add to their maldevelopment. Students will undertake an original piece of research on an international development topic of special interest to them. They will also be invited to meet with prominent professionals in the international development community. (Distribution)
FRSM 106.301, Wednesday, 2:00—5:00

Person As Patient
Elsa Ramsden, Associate University Professor
This seminar focuses on the resources an individual brings to the experience of being a patient; cultural background, belief system, age and life experience all play important roles. Discussion, readings, case study analyses and experience-based learning, design characterize the time spent together. (Distribution)
FRSM 108.301, Tuesday & Thursday, 3:00-4:30

Integrity
Joan Goodman, Professor of Elementary Education and
Howard Lesnick, Professor of Law
The concept of integrity as a moral value has been aptly called both fundamental and elusive. Drawing on readings from literature, philosophy and the social sciences, this course will examine the meaning of integrity and the reasons underlying its centrality and elusiveness. We will also consider the ways in which it may come to play a defining role in decision-making, both in our personal lives as students, teachers and citizens and in the ethics of such professions as business, education, law and medicine. (Distribution)
FRSM 128.301, Tuesday & Thursday, 10:30-12:00

Terrorism
Stephen Gale, Associate Professor of Political Science
This course is designed to stimulate an interest in the philosophy and methods of terrorism; to illustrate the varieties of conditions under which methods of terrorism are used; to outline the institutional conditions that permit and support the use of terrorism; and to understand the problems involved in "solving" the terrorism dilemma. (Distribution)
PSCI 009.301, Tuesday, 3:00—6:00

Race and Ethnicity
Jerome Maddox, Assistant Professor of Political Science
The seminar will examine a variety of topics in the study of American politics through the prism of race and ethnicity. The course will consider how minority status affects the participation and representation of various groups in American society. In addition, the course will examine how considerations of race and ethnicity influence the development and implementation public policy, including social policy and immigration policy. An underlying theme is the tension between class and race and the implications for public policy. (Distribution)
PSCI 009.302, Wednesday 2:00—5:00

Debating the Cuban Revolution
Jono Resende-Santos, Visiting Professor of Political Science
No other single historical event has had as deep an impact on affairs in the Western Hemisphere as the Cuban Revolution. Indeed, for a tiny island nation no bigger than the state of Pennsylvania, Cuba and the Cuban Revolution have had a disproportionate influence on United States foreign policy, on relations between the U.S. and its Latin American neighbors, but also on world affairs. It is no exaggeration to say that the closest human civilization has come to nuclear annihilation was the October 196Z stand-off between the US and the Soviet Union over the future of the Cuban Revolution. The 1959 Cuban Revolution proved deeply divisive both inside and outside Cuba. As the recent unfortunate custody battle over the six-year-old boy in Miami illustrates, the Revolution continues today to trigger emotionally charged, heated debates over its meaning and nature. In this seminar we will examine the debate and conflicting interpretations regarding the origins, character, policies, legitimacy and future of the Cuban Revolution. We will do so from a variety of perspectives—from an academic as well as the personal standpoint, political as well as economic and sociological. One of the main goals of the seminar is to sharpen your analytic and writing skills, and heavy emphasis will be placed on seminar discussions and presentations. (Distribution)
PSCI 009.303, Tuesday 1:30—4:30

Constitution Making
William Harris, Associate Professor of Political Science
This is a seminar in constitutional theory that will focus on the problems of creating or restructuring a political order by writing and adopting the design of that order in a set of words contained within a text. The course will have a large component of political and interpretive theory, as well as American political thought. There may be some materials from other constitutional systems besides the United States. However, the course is primarily a way of looking analytically at the founding of the American Constitution by considering how a new constitution would be written, argued for and ratified more than 200 years later—then questioning the nature of its authority. After more than two centuries of experience in interpreting the existing constitutional document, how might a constitution-maker draft a new one to take into account the problems that we have discovered?
Requirement: Extensive reading and active scholarly discussion; one short analytical paper, one medium-length paper; and a final essay examination. This is a General Honors course; however, half of the seats are reserved for students who are not in the General Honors program. (Distribution l: Society)
PSCI 187.301, Tuesday & Thursday, 3:00—4:30

Male-Female Communications, East and West
Franklin Southworth, Professor of South Asian Studies
Every individual has a unique way of speaking. Some of our differences in speech style are individual, while others are affected by our gender, our upbringing, ethnic group membership, place of origin, socio-economic class, age or other factors. These differences can enrich, and sometimes complicate, our verbal Interactions.
This course looks at these differences in a cross-culturally oriented framework which emphasizes the social context of face-to-face communication, both verbal and nonverbal. We will be concerned with communication in male groups, in female groups, and in mixed groups, in our own society and in others. We will look at aspects of social behavior that correlate with communicative differences. We will seek explanations of communicative differences in terms of the socialization process and the different social roles that we play as men or women, and as members of different social groupings.
Apart from learning about interactions between language and social life in our own and other societies, the course is designed to enhance observational skills and to encourage an analytical approach to the study of verbal and nonverbal communication. One weekly two-hour session will be devoted primarily to discussion of the readings (which include writings by linguists, anthropologists and sociologists, social and educational psychologists, political scientists and others) with minimal lecturing. A second one-hour session will be used for observation and practice, including simulated interactions and films. In all of our discussions, we will attempt to bridge the cultural experiences of North Americans and those of members of other societies (particularly South Asians).
The first eight weeks of the course will acquaint students with the main assumptions made about this subject by works in a number of different disciplines. The remaining time will be spent on individual research projects, including discussion of individual readings. The papers and projects will involve both library research and observational research.
Papers: Four short (2-page) papers on specified subjects and one final paper on individual work. Regular attendance and participation in discussion are expected. (General Requirement)
SARS 013.401 or WSTD 013.401, Wednesday, 2:00—5:00

Media in American Society
Diana Crane-Herve, Professor of Sociology
This course will examine the role of television, newspapers, film and advertising in American society. We will analyze the impact of the media on social and political institutions and on the American public, factors affecting the selection and interpretation of news for broadcast and publication, and the economic and ideological connections between broadcast and print media and advertising. (Distribution)
SOCI 041.301, Monday & Wednesday, 3:00—4:30
War and Peace: Theories of the Causes and Prevention of War
William Evan, Professor of Sociology
Seven theories of the causes of war will be tested by case analyses of well-documented wars through history—from the Peloponnesian Wars to the Yugoslav War. The concluding session of the course deals with five theories and strategies for the prevention of war. (Distribution)
SOCI 05:2.301, Wednesday, 2:00—5:00

Homelessness and The Urban Crisis
June Averyt, Lecturer in Urban Studies
This seminar in Urban Studies introduces students to many of the major social issues confronting our nations cities by focusing specifically on the problem of urban homelessness. The course examines the treatment of homelessness and extreme impoverishment as social problems historically, as well as through contemporary debates. Several areas of intensive study will include: the low-income housing crisis, welfare reform and income maintenance strategies, health care issues, and urban/suburban relationships. Particular attention is also paid to the structure of emergency services for people who have housing emergencies. The course concludes by examining current policies and advocacy strategies. (Distribution)
URBS 100.301, Wednesday, 5:00—8:00

SECTOR II: HISTORY & TRADITION

Jewish Law and Ethics
Barry Eichler, Associate Professor of Assyrian
An introduction to the literary and legal sources of Jewish law within an historical framework. Emphasis will be placed upon the development and dynamics of Jewish jurisprudence and the relationship between Jewish law and social ethics. (Distribution)
AMES 152/401or JWST l52.401, Tuesday & Thursday, 9:00—10:30

Native Peoples and the Environment
Clark Erickson, Associate Professor of Anthropology
The relationship between the activities of native peoples and the environment is a complex and contentious issue. One perspective argues that native peoples had little impact on the environments because of their low population densities, limited technology, and conservation ethic and worldview. At the other extreme, biodiversity, and Nature itself, is considered the product of a long history of human activities. This seminar will examine the Myth of the Ecologically Noble Savage, the Myth of the Pristine Environment, the alliance between native peoples and Green Politics, and the contribution of native peoples to appropriate technology, sustainable development and conservation of biodiversity. (Distribution)
ANTH 133.301, Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00—1:30

Germany and the Holocaust
Frank Trommler, Professor of German
We know much about the Holocaust. Countless document collections, memoirs and testimonies have shed light on the worst chapter of 20th century history. Less is known about how Germans dealt with this cataclysm since 1945. How have writers, politicians and teachers, young and old people, perpetrators and bystanders, East and West Germans reacted to this event which is still haunting this country? Every decade seems to bring a new widely discussed encounter with the past; in the 19905 it is the debate about a Holocaust memorial to be built in Berlin, the capital of a newly united Germany. This seminar will illuminate the developments since 1945 with special emphasis on literature that has been a catalyst for inquiries into memory and guilt. Readings of Peter Weiss, Jureck Becker, Max Frisch, Bernhard Schlink and a host of young Jewish writers, together with discussions of policies and political texts and visual documentaries, will be the basis for a thorough introduction to an important chapter of our time. (Distribution)
GRMN 004.301, Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00—1:30

Heresy, Dissent and Inquisition
Paul Mosher, Vice Provost and Director of Libraries
Heresy—at once the horror of the Middle Ages in the West and one of its shaping movements—has been a preoccupation of thinkers since Socrates drank his hemlock. In this seminar we will study and discuss selected original sources in translation which treat the origins and development of popular heresies in Western Europe, the heretics and their beliefs, the Inquisition and other efforts to repress them, and the impact of religious dissent and repression on the evolution of church, state and modern society. The basis of the course grade will be discussion and short papers based on source readings. This seminar will be taught in the private Penn library of Henry Charles Lea, the greatest 19th century scholar of the Medieval Inquisition. (Distribution)
HIST 101.301, Wednesday, 3:00-6:00

The Year 100: The End of the World
Edward Peters, Professor of History
The course will treat three related historical topics: the history and significance of the dating system that made such terms as "YZK" possible—and troublesome; the culture of Europe around the year 1000 and Europeans' solution to what might be called the "YIK" (or to be precise, what they would have called "YM") problem; and the ongoing concerns with millennarianism (as the scenario of the Last Days, the arrival of Antichrist and the Second Coming) through the later Middle Ages into the reformations of the 16th century. Where possible we will base our research on original source materials in translation as well as the best available recent scholarship. One of our concerns will be to rethink the traditions of millennarianism in the light of current concerns in many areas of modern culture. The course will range across historical sources proper as well as materials from literature, anthropology, art history and religious studies. (Distribution)
HIST 101.302, Tuesday, 1:30 - 4:30

Representing Violence in the Medieval Period
Daniel Baraz, Mellon Fellow in History
Violence was represented in the Middle Ages in many ways. It could be reported briefly or in all its gory detail, with or without authorial comment, and with or without emotion. The author's attitude was sometimes expressed explicitly, sometimes implicitly, and sometimes ambiguously. The events themselves were at times described factually, while in other instances the narration is affective or even sentimental.
The stylistic choices related to these variations are not random but come and go with differences in period, literary genre, and most importantly, the function of the narration. The course will examine these issues and the social and political implications of style in the representation of violence in different types of medieval sources: chronicles, hagiography, literature and iconographic sources. Reference will be made to relevant disciplines of the social sciences, such as sociology and social psychology. (Distribution)
HIST 101.303, Thursday, 1:30- 4:30

Literature of Dissent
Benjamin Nathans, Assistant Professor of History
Can the pen really be mightier than the sword? What kind of people dare to speak truth to power, and what arguments and values do they employ? In this seminar we will study some of the classic literature of dissent, including biblical prophecy, ancient Greek critiques of popular rule, the Protestant Reformation, the revolutionary Enlightenment and the dissident movements of our own century in Nazi Germany, the Soviet Union and contemporary China. Across this spectrum we will be concerned with the intellectual strategies of resistance to systems of power perceived as illegitimate or unjust, and the power of the word in political and public life. By analyzing how the desire for fundamental change has been articulated in a variety of historical contexts, we will sharpen our skills in critical reading and group discussion. Students will also write several short papers on selected primary sources. (Distribution)
HIST 102.301, Tuesday, 2:00-5:00

Human Nature and History
Michael Zuckerman, Professor of History
A consideration of the nature of man, with primary emphasis on the question of history: Is human nature best understood as constant or contingent, stable or changeful with time and circumstance? (Distribution)
HIST 104.301, Wednesday, 2:00-5:00

Decade of the Sixties: Watershed or Aberration
Sheldon Hackney, Professor of History
This seminar will examine the history of the i960s with special attention to the social protest movements and the challenges to the traditional values that marked the period. For our purpose, the Sixties extend from the Brown decision in 1954 to Watergate twenty years later. (Distribution)
HIST 104.302, Thursday, 2:00-5:00

Rise and Fall of the British Empire
Lynn Lees, Professor of History
How and why did a small set of islands off the western coast of Europe come to dominate much of North America, the Caribbean, Africa, and South and Southeast Asia between 1700 and 1940? Why did Britain's control of its colonies collapse so fast between 1945 and 1970? What was the impact of empire on the colonized? The seminar will examine case studies of and explanations for empire. Films, primary sources and fiction will be used to analyze attitudes toward empire. Each student will write a paper on some aspect of decolonization or colonial nationalism in an area of his or her choice. (Distribution)
HIST 106.301, Wednesday, 2:00-5:00

Unveiling Women's Lives: Women in the Middle East and North Africa
Firoozeh Kashani-Sabet, Assistant Professor of History
This course offers a comparative perspective on the lives of women in non-Western societies, primarily in Asia and Africa. It combines historical accounts with select fictional works to study women's social and cultural milieu under colonialism as well as the evolution of women's roles in politics and society with the emergence of independent nation-states in the Middle East and North Africa. By crossing national boundaries, this course highlights the diversity of women's experiences in the public and private spheres. (Distribution)
HIST 106.302, Monday, 2:00-5:00

Divided Korea: 1945-Present
Milan Hejtmanek, Assistant Professor of History
This course is designed to illuminate the complex and turbulent histories of North and South Korea over the past half century. Korea had been a unified state for over a millennium; yet within a few short years after being arbitrarily partitioned at the end of World War II it became embroiled in one of the bloodiest and most violent conflicts of the 20th century, leading to a tense standoff that continues to the present. Topics treated will include the cultural divide between the two regions inherited from the 19th century and the Japanese colonial period; the impact of the Cold War on Korea; the Korean War and its legacy; the rule of Kim II Sung in the north and Syngman Rhee, Park Chung Hee, and Chun Du Hwan in the south; and movement toward unification since the end of the Cold War. In addition to reading a wide variety of written primary sources, we will hear from participants in the Korean War and view television documentaries and feature films treating the North-South split. (Distribution)
HIST 106.303, Tuesday, 2:00-5:00

Utopian Thought 1800-Present
Michael Ryan, Adjunct Assistant Professor of History
In the wake of the 18th century Enlightenment and the French Revolution, utopia became an urgent concern of European and American intellectuals, prophets, clerics and social engineers. If the 19th century was the high-water mark of utopian programs and projects, the utopian impulse survived well into the 20th century, despite the horror of two global wars of unprecedented violence and destruction and of the Holocaust. Although many cultural observers today lament the passing of the utopian tradition ("we cannot dream of the best any longer"), it does survive among small communities, religious sects, sundry intellectuals, architects and others. The course will consider some of the major figures in the modern utopian tradition, from the Comte de Saint-Simon, Richard Godwin, and the Marquis de Sade, through Marx and his socialist competitors to artists and architects such as William Morris and Le Corbusier, academics such as B. E Skinner, and cultural nationalists such as Martin Buber. It is an eclectic but fascinating menagerie of individuals and traditions linked only by the common thread of "keeping the dream alive." Freshman General Honors course. Non-honors students need permission. (Distribution)
HIST 112.301, Wednesday, 2:00-5:00

Bilingualism in History
Gillian Sankoff, Professor of Linguistics
This course takes a historical approach to tracing (and reconstructing) the nature of language contacts and bilingualism, over the course of human history. Contacts between groups of people speaking different languages are documented from earliest records, motivated by trade, migration, conquest and intermarriage. At the same time, differences in socio-historical context have created different kinds of linguistic outcomes. Some languages have been completely lost; new languages have been created. In still other cases, the nature and structure of language has been radically altered. We will review the reasons for and nature of bilingualism in situations ranging from the nomadic or horticultural societies of the Amazonian region, of southern Africa, or of precolonial Australia and New Guinea; to the languages of intercommunication along the great trade routes of antiquity; to the genesis of pidgin and creole languages in the plantation societies of the 16th-lgth centuries; to the imposition of new languages by colonial governments; to the assimilation of immigrants in modern industrial societies.
The course will introduce the basics of linguistic structure through a discussion of which aspects of language have proved to be relatively stable, and which are readily altered, under conditions of bilingualism. Languages may readily borrow words from each other, but do they maintain their structural integrity? Do bilinguals keep their languages apart? Are "mixed language" a reality, or simply a way of stigmatizing the way bilinguals sometimes speak? The first month of the semester will be devoted to reading and discussing a wide variety of contact situations. Then students (working individually or with a self-selected partner) will choose a particular place and time to focus on, writing one paper on the social aspects of contact and one paper on the influences the languages have had on each other. (Distribution)
LING 054.301, Tuesday & Thursday,12:00-1:30

Introduction to the Problems of Philosophy
Staff
This seminar is designed for students who are approaching philosophy for the first time. We will examine central philosophical problems from topics such as the existence of God, the mind-body problem, free will, theory of knowledge, ethics and the scientific method. Three alternative sections are offered. (General Requirement)
PHIL 001.301, Tuesday & Thursday, 9:00-10:30
PHIL 001.302, Tuesday & Thursday, 10:30 - 12:30
PHIL 001.303, Tuesday & Thursday, 1:30-3:00

Freshman Seminars 2000

Lords of the Nile
Josef Wegner, Assistant Professor of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies
In this course we will examine the ways in which one of the worlds most ancient and longest lasting civilizations was governed. Egypt is renowned for the ubiquitous images of its Pharaohs: divine kings who ruled Egypt under the divine sanction of the gods. The king was only the top of a vast pyramid of powerful officials that included viziers, treasurers, military leaders, local governors, town mayors and scribes. The course aims to investigate the ways in which the rulership of Egypt worked: from the highest levels of royal power down to the running of towns and villages. (Distribution)
AMES 066.301, Monday &Wednesday, 3:00-4:30

Journeys in Arabic Narrative
Roger Allen, Professor of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies
An investigation of journeys, real and metaphorical, as portrayed in Arabic literary texts. All readings are in English, and no cultural background is required. (Distribution)
AMES 038.301, Tuesday & Thursday, 3:00-4:30

Medicine, Literature and Culture: Japan
William R .LaFleur, Professor of Japanese Studies
This seminar is in many ways an exercise in comparison—by looking at how the practice of medicine in Japan differs from that in America. Japan, where people enjoy good health and live very long lives, not only combines "Western" with "Eastern" medical practices but also is a place where questions of medical ethics and biotechnology are often faced differently than they are in America. The fact that in modern times many Japanese writers had medical educations makes Japanese literature, studied here in translation, a rich context for exploring a wide range of such questions. Film too will be a tool for our studies. A comparative look at how we might think about the body, the mind, and healing or dying processes will be the central focus of this seminar. (Distribution)
AMES 197.301, Tuesday, 2:00-5:00

Music and Culture
David Samuels, Mellon Fellow in Anthropology
The purpose of this class is to introduce students to some of the major themes and issues surrounding the relationship between musical expression and human social life. The course is not designed as a complete introduction to the world's musics. Instead, we will concentrate on a selection of musical and expressive styles in order to discuss the socially and culturally organized life of sound, aesthetics and performance. Among the broad questions to be addressed during the semester will be: How does music express social identity, value and difference? Are musics endangered when people are? Or when environments are? When and how is music-making affirming and empowering? Can musical expression participate in the destruction as well as the production of social life?
The class focuses on contemporary questions of musical expression in a time of massive cultural upheaval, displacement and globalization. It can be argued, of course, that the human social world has always been a place of constant change. But today it is changing at a rate and in ways unprecedented at any time in the past. It would thus be a disservice to treat this class as an introduction to the unchanged and unchanging musical "traditions" of the world. While tradition, and the moral authority of tradition, will be important and recurring issues in our understanding of readings and class discussions, we will explore the issue by listening to musics of indigenous peoples, migrants and immigrants, and by studying music-making in times of social rupture and loss of place. Such rupture might occur in the face of violent conflict, corporate expansionism, or transnational migration. Case studies might include "Pygmy" music in the Central African rainforests, mbira spirit possession music in Zimbabwe, Kaluli music in the rainforests of Papua New Guinea, Native American musics, Johannesburg mbaqanga bands, Balkan women's choral singing, southwest border conjunto, and Native American or Aboriginal Australian rock and country music, as well as styles and examples brought up by class members. Class sessions will include discussion, listening, and video-viewing. (Distribution)
ANTH 086.301, Wednesday, 2:00-5:00

The Look of Architecture
Staff
The "built environment" plays a gigantic role in human experience and art. This
seminar will examine the making of some of the most important buildings in history,
with special attention to examples in Philadelphia. (Distribution)
ARTH 100.30, Monday, 2:00-5:00
Styles of Desire: Medieval and Renaissance Courts and Courtly Arts
Rebecca Zorach, Mellon Fellow in the History of Art
Through selected examples in art and literature, this seminar will study the aesthetic and social ideals that characterized European court societies in the late medieval and early modern periods. Topics include the courtly body and its care and grooming; the rise of manners and ideals of civility; chivalry and its representations; spectacles of power; secret intrigues and aesthetic silences; games and gardens. Particular attention will be paid to courtly aesthetics in the visual arts and the development of the romantic psychology of courtly love. Our case studies are chosen from several centuries in order to suggest both the continuities of courtly style and significant historical differences; we will also consider the continuing influence of courtly ideas on our own notions of gender, politics and polite society, and time permitting we will screen one or more contemporary films, such as Shakespeare in Love and The Crying Game. Readings include works by Christine de Pizan, Baldassare Castiglione, Torquato Tasso, Jan Huizinga, Norbert Elias, Millard Meiss, Alison Cole, Michael Camille and Julia Kristeva. (Distribution)
ARTH 100.302, Tuesday, 3:00-6:00

From Plato's Cave to The Matrix: Ideology and Popular Cinema
Professor Jacqui Sadashige, Assistant Professor of Classical Studies
In The Republic, the Greek philosopher Plato argues that censorship is essential to the creation of an ideal state. Fundamental to his argument is the idea that the things people see and hear will have a direct influence on how they behave. Research has not proven that movies cause violence, but many scholars of popular culture believe that cinema and other forms of media bear a complex relationship to our collective fears, anxieties, desires and preoccupations. Throughout the semester, we will be moving between critical readings from Marxist, feminist and psychoanalytical theorists and the popular films that will serve as our objects of scrutiny. By viewing the films from a variety of critical perspectives, we will probe the ideological underpinnings of popular cinema and likewise, the collective American psyche. Students can expect 7 to 10 film screenings, including James Cameron's Titanic, several Disney animated features, American Beauty, and The Matrix. (Distribution)
CLST 165.401 or FILM 165.401, Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00-1:30

Topics in Literature: The Trial
Paul J. Korshin, Professor of English
Literary depictions of legal trials have occurred for several millennia. The first famous literary trial is Plato's account of that of Socrates. We find allusions to legal trials throughout the middle ages and the European Renaissance. The greatest number of literary works embodying legal trials date from the last two centuries, and in this course we will discuss a wide variety of such literature, starting with Plato. Most literary trials deal with criminal justice, as in Twain's Pudd'nhead Wilson, Wrights Native Son, Faulkner's Intruder in the Dust, Camus' The Stranger, Wouk's The Caine Mutiny, Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird, and Cozzens's The Just and the Unjust. Some deal with civil justice, like the play of Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee, Inherit the Wind, and Jonathan Harr's A Civil Action. Finally, some literary trials mock real justice, as in Kafka's The Trial and Koestlers Darkness at Noon. This course is intended for students interested in law as well as in literature. (Distribution)
ENGL (197) 016.301, Wednesday, 2:00-5:00

Topics in Literature: Living Books, Dead Books
Dan Traister, Adjunct, Department of English, and Curator, Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Pennsylvania Libraries
How do we choose the relatively few books we read, whether in school or on our own, as opposed to the many books we do not read? What are the differences between them? Can we begin to generalize usefully about the characteristics of those few books that stay alive or come back to life after lying unnoticed for a period of time?
We will read a number of works, both "living" and "dead," to see if we can define any of the factors that affect a book's fortunes. We may read an early English work or two, and will certainly read some American books that have been marginalized because they are by or about people who are not WASPS or who don't come from important places like the East or the West Coasts. We'll read a bigoted novel or two, looking at the differences between their popularity when they were originally written and their marginal status now (if, in fact, they are marginal). A long final section will concentrate on writers from or about Indiana. We'll always ask what gave, or failed to give, the works we read staying power. As we go, we'll read a bit of scholarly and popular writing about the formation and maintenance of literary canons.
This course is for people who like to read. It will also ask for papers and classroom discussion. The instructor is currently working on the topic. It relates both to his own recent published work but also to his job, which is to buy English-language literature for the University's Library. (Distribution)
ENGL 016.302, Tuesday & Thursday, 3:00-4:30

Representations of the Holocaust in Literature and Film
Millicent Marcus, Professor of Romance Languages and
AI Filreis, Professor of English
This is a seminar about the Holocaust as it has been depicted in books, film and written or oral testimony by survivors. The Holocaust is aptly conceived as a locus for studying the most basic and urgent problems of aesthetics and authority, of metaphorizing memory and pain, of representing evil, of symbolism and action, of narrative immediacy and political truth-telling, and of testimony (witness-bearing) as legal and language forms. Participants in the seminar will approach all these topics through interactive discussions of a wide variety of films, commentaries, literary texts, testimonies, and theoretical writings about the Holocaust.
The course is primarily for first-year students. Sophomores may enroll only by permission of the instructors. Assignments will include frequent short papers and a final exam. In addition to attending all regular class meeting times, students will be expected to attend all film screenings (most Mondays at 4:oo PM). (Distribution)
ENGL 016.401 or JWST 160.401 or FILM 160.401
Tuesday & Thursday 10:30- 12:00, Film Screening Monday 4:00

Food for Thought: Cannibalism and Gastronomy in Literature and Film
Simon Richter, Associate Professor of German
Simply put, this course offers students an opportunity to reflect on the cultural meaning of food in human life. A choice selection of works of literature and film will allow us to explore the cultural, philosophical and aesthetic issues related to hunger, gastronomy and cannibalism. Films may include: Parents, Delicatessen, Tampopo, Like Water for Chocolate and Babettes Feast. Among the authors we will read are: Knut Hamsun, Isak Dinesen, Sigmund Freud and Laura Esquivel. Needless to say, the seminar will require the occasional empirical exercise—also known as eating—in conjunction with the films and literature that concern us. A perfect opportunity to learn more about the culinary scene in Philadelphia. A11 readings and class discussions will be in English. (Distribution)
GRMN 007.301, Monday & Wednesday, 3:00-4:30

My Angel Me Do It
Karl Otto, Professor of German
Angels, angels, angels—they are everywhere these days. You've seen them on TV (Touched By an Angel) and in films (e.g., Dogma). What are they really? Do they exist? Who are they? Why do some people think they have one? Good angels? Bad angels? We will explore angels from artistic, literary, theological and cultural perspectives. We will read and discuss, in English, some works of Rilke, Goethe, Milton, Fuentes, Marlowe, Benjamin, France and others; we'll view and discuss Wings of Desire and other films. We will consider the Jewish, the Christian and the Moslem perspectives and views. (Distribution)
GRMN 010.301, Monday, Wednesday & Friday, 11:00-12:00

The Symphony
Lawrence Bernstein, Professor of Music
In this seminar we shall study, in close detail, representative symphonies by Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Berlioz, Schumann, Brahms, Tchaikowsky and Mahler. Historical developments will be considered, along with the effects upon symphonic literature of such major sociological changes as the emergence of the public concert hall. But the emphasis will be on the music itself—particularly on the ways we can sharpen our abilities to engage and comprehend the composers' musical rhetoric. An attempt will be made to correlate the repertory studied with works scheduled for performance by the Philadelphia Orchestra, for which discount or complimentary tickets are generally available. No technical skills in music are required as a prerequisite for this course. (Distribution)
MUSC 040.301, Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00-1:30

National Style in 19th and 20th Century Music
Alexander Rehding, Mellon Fellow in Music
What are national styles in music? Most of us have a fairly clear idea of what, say, Hungarian music is supposed to sound like and what makes it special—just think of Liszt's Hungarian Rhapsodies or Brahms' Hungarian Dances. But this distinctiveness of national style is by and large a phenomenon of the 19th century (most people would be hard pressed to describe what is special about 18th century Hungarian music). From the 19th century onwards, many composers in Europe and America looked for material in the folk music of their own nation (sometimes the music of other nations), and many countries were anxious to foster a national style. In examining a selection of musical works—from the Russian composer Michail Glinka (804-1857) to recent Latin-American music on the charts—and relevant critical texts, this course addresses a number of questions that are still of relevance in our own age: What kind of relationship is imagined between a nation and its music? How were national styles forged? How can music represent a nation? And why is it considered natural, advantageous, or indeed necessary, to have a distinct national identity in music? (Distribution)
MUSC 017.301, Wednesday, 2:00-5:00

Philosophy and the Arts
John Zeimloekis, Mellon Fellow in Philosophy
What are the differences between illusions, lies and artistic fictions? Are beauty and ugliness really in objects or only in the eye of the beholder? Questions like these will take us from the origins of aesthetics in ancient and Enlightenment philosophy to current issues in art. We will examine the ideas of mimesis and appearance, the problems of taste and aesthetic judgment, and the relation of aesthetic attitudes to other forms of human thought and action in ancient writers such as Plato and Aristotle, 8th century authors such as David Hume and Immanuel Kant, and contemporary philosophers such as Monroe Beardsley, George Dickie and Kendall Walton. (Distribution)
PHIL 020.301,Wednesday, 3:00-6:00

SECTOR IV: FORMAL REASONING AND ANALYSIS

Introduction to Mathematical Analysis
Charles Epstein, Professor of Mathematics
Introduction to mathematical reasoning by discussion of the basic theorems encountered in calculus. It is intended for those students who might like to study more advanced mathematics by giving a more balanced view of what mathematics is actually like than calculus courses alone can provide. This is a half-credit course and does not satisfy the General Requirement. There are two alternative sections of this course.
MATH 200.301, Tuesday, 1:30—3:00
MATH 200.302, Thursday, 1:30 - 3:00

Introduction to Modern Algebra
Antonella Grassi, Assistant Professor of Mathematics
This course is an introduction to mathematical reasoning. Topics include the principle of mathematical induction, the notion of an equivalence relation, and the properties of the ring of integers. It is intended for students who might like to study more advanced math. It provides an introduction to the basic 300-level course in algebra. The instructor acts as the advisor for the students and assists them in choosing the appropriate 300-level course for the following year.
This is a half-credit course and it does not satisfy the General Requirement. There are two alternative sections of this course.
MATH 204.301, Tuesday, 12:00—1:30
MATH 204.302, Thursday, 12:00—1:30

SECTOR V: THE LIVING WORLD

Evolution of the Brain
Thomas Schoenemann, Assistant Professor of Anthropology
An introduction to the study of the evolution of the human brain. Comparative (cross-species) perspectives will be emphasized, along with evolutionary biological costs of neural tissue. Basic brain structure, function, and development will be reviewed. The fossil evidence as well as indirect evidence (archaeological and comparative) will be discussed. Current controversies and theories about the causes and consequences of hominid brain evolution will be reviewed, including the possible role of language, tool use, sociality, dietary shifts and other behavioral adaptations. (General Requirement)
ANTH 179. 301, Monday, Wednesday & Friday, 11:00-12:00

SECTOR Vl: THE PHYSICAL WORLD

Structural Biology and Genomics Seminar
Ponzy Lu, Professor of Chemistry
Structural biology is the scientific method of describing, predicting, and changing the properties of living organisms, including humans, based on complete genome structures and three-dimensional structures of cellular components. It is a direct outgrowth of the intellectual and technical revolutions that occurred during the last decade. It has become a most powerful approach to understanding biology and solving problems in medicine. We will discuss how macroscopic biological properties, such as reproduction, locomotion and viral infection are determined by chemical properties of proteins and nucleic acids. Changes in biological function, such as those that accompany hereditary diseases like cystic fibrosis or sickle cell anemia, result from minute changes in individual proteins. Much larger changes in genome and protein structure, however, are often tolerated without apparent consequence. This selectivity and tolerance provides opportunities for the biotechnology industry to alter biological functions in ways thought to guarantee profits. Topics discussed include the human genome project, the retrovirus (HIV) that is the causative agent of AIDS and the molecular basis for brain function. We will also examine how research results, especially those of structural biology, are presented to its various audiences. The broad range of medical, social and political problems associated with these advances will also be considered. (General Requirement)
CHEM 022.301, Thursday, 1:30-3:00

Freshman Recitation
Evolution of the Physical World

Hermann Pfefferkorn, Professor of Earth and Environmental Science
and Gino Segre, Professor of Physics
This course will explore the Big Bang, and the origin of elements, stars, Earth, continents, and oceans. Students must register for both the lecture and a recitation. The
recitation listed below is restricted to freshmen and is led by Professors Pfefferkorn
and Segre. (General Requirement)
GEOL 003.401 (lecture), Tuesday & Thursday, 1:30-3:00
GEOL 003.402 (recitation), Tuesday, 3:00-4:00

Freshman Recitation
Introduction to Geology

Reginald Shagam, Adjunct Professor of Geology
This course is an introduction to the processes and forces that form the surface and the interior of the Earth. We will discuss changes in climate and the history of life. We will also discuss Earth resources and their uses. Students must register for both the lecture and a recitation. The recitation listed below is restricted to freshmen and is led by Professor Shagam. (General Requirement)
GEOL 100.001 (lecture), Monday, Wednesday & Friday, 11:00-12:00
GEOL 100.201 (recitation), Monday, 2:00-3:00

Honors Physics I: Mechanics and Wave Motion
Alan T. Johnson, Assistant Professor of Physics
This course parallels and extends the content of the introductory physics course for
students in engineering and in the physical sciences, at a higher mathematical level.
It is the first semester of a small-section two-semester sequence recommended for
well-prepared students, and particularly for those planning to major in physics.
Classical laws of motion: interaction between particles, conservation laws and symmetry principles, rigid body motion, noninertial reference frames, oscillations.
Prerequisites: MATH 140 and 141. Students must register for the lecture and the lab.
Non-honors students need permission. (General Requirement)
PHYS 170.301 (lecture), Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10:00-11:00
Monday 2:00-3:00
Tuesday 11:00-12:00
PHYS 170.302 (laboratory) Wednesday, 1:00-3:00

SECTOR VII: SCIENCE STUDIES

Science and Social Problems
Henrika Kuklick, Professor of History and Sociology of Science
When knowledge leads to power, how is society as a whole affected? Case studies of
the role of science in contemporary decision-making in public and business affairs.
(General Requirement)
HSSC 165.301, Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00-1:30

Human Nature: Classical and Modern Perspectives
Justin Aronfreed, Professor of Psychology
This seminar presents an historically ordered series of readings from original sources, coupled with active weekly discussions. We will emphasize the essence and boundaries of mankind's natural heritage-enduring timeless dispositions of mind and action that transcend individual selves or social institutions. Perspectives from within Western civilization will be used to exemplify sweeping conceptions of the human condition. These will begin with earlier mythological, religious and philosophical sources, and progress toward modern scientific paradigms of making inquiry into nature.
The seminar will draw its exemplars from antiquity, the later Greco-Roman period, the medieval and Renaissance eras, the Enlightenment, the mid-19th century, the early 20th century, and the present time. Two weeks will be given to each perspective. All seminar members will read the same basic sources (approximately 1oo pages each week) and will be expected to show intellectual initiative in all weekly discussions. Formal requirements consist primarily of a biweekly paper on each perspective.
This seminar is well suited to students who show the following: (I) articulate ease of intellectual expression in both spoken and written English; (z) a desire for some serious investment in ideas and the life of the mind; (3) a warm willingness to engage the natural science component of a liberal education. Special consideration will be given to honors students. (General Requirement)
PSYC (050.301, Thursday, 3:00-6:00

GENERAL HONORS

Great Books of Judaism
David Stern, Professor on Asian and Middle Eastern Studies
This course will be devoted to four classic works of Jewish literature: The Talmud, Biblical Commentary, the Passover Haggadah and the Siddur or prayerbook. The course will introduce the student to these books through selected readings in order to show how they are to be read and appreciated, and through studying the history of their development and their place in Jewish tradition. We will also deal with the history of these classics as books and as material objects. All readings are in translation and no previous background is required. (General Requirement Ill: Arts and Letters)
AMES 151.401 or JWST 151.401 or RELS 027.401
Tuesday & Thursday, 10:30-12:00

The American Legal System
Samuel Diamond, Visiting Lecturer in General Honors
This course will examine how American civil law responds to economic, social, technological and political change. This course will trace selected areas of law which illustrate laws dynamic. Some of the areas of special current legal interest include the law as arbiter of scientific truth; issues of life and death (who decides on the giving or withholding of medical treatment of those who can—and those who cannot—decide for themselves); the changing ground rules of sexual harassment in the workplace; rights of the disabled and the fine line between administering pain relief and medical intervention resulting in death; and the increasing expansion of legislation to speed "corrections" in the common law. (Distribution l: Society)
GLAW 064.301, Tuesday & Thursday, 1:30-3:00

Utopian Thought 1800-Present
Michael Ryan, Adjunct Assistant Professor of History
In the wake of the 18th century Enlightenment and the French Revolution, utopia became an urgent concern of European and American intellectuals, prophets, clerics and social engineers. If the 19th century was the high water-mark of utopian programs and projects, the utopian impulse survived well into the 20th century, in spite of the horror of two global wars of unprecedented violence and destruction and of the Holocaust. Although many cultural observers today lament the passing of the utopian tradition ("we cannot dream of the best any longer"), it does survive among small communities, religious sects, and sundry intellectuals, architects and others. The course will consider some of the major figures in the modern utopian tradition, from the Comte de Saint-Simon, Richard Godwin and the Marquis de Sade through Marx and his socialist competitors to artists and architects such as William Morris and Le Corbusier, academics such as B. F. Skinner and cultural nationalists such Martin Buber. It is an eclectic but fascinating menagerie of individuals and traditions linked only by the common thread of "keeping the dream alive." Freshman General Honors course. Non-honors students need permission. (Distribution II: History and Tradition)
HIST 112.301, Wednesday, 2:00-5:00

Who Owns the Past
Henrika Kuklick, Professor of History and Sociology of Science
The recent controversies over the Enola Gay exhibit and the teaching of U.S. history to school children have made exceptionally visible the degree to which history may be used to define national identity. Scientific achievements may play central roles in partisan accounts—both as testimonials to national virtue and as the means to resolve various sorts of disputes. This course will discuss the uses of history in contemporary and past situations, drawing examples from the U.S., Europe, the Middle East and Africa. (Distribution II: History and Tradition)
HSSC 438.301, Thursday, 2:00-5:00

Induction to Law and Legal Process
Eric Orts, Associate Professor of Legal Studies
The first part of this course will inquire into the nature of law and the legal process, the second part will introduce the law of contracts, and the last will cover some of the basic principles of international law.
GST 101.301, Tuesday &Thursday, 10:30 -12:00

Honors Physics I
Mechanics and Wave Motion

Professor of Physics
This course parallels and extends the content of the introductory physics course for students in engineering and in the physical sciences, at a higher mathematical level. It is the first semester of a small-section two-semester sequence recommended for well-prepared students, and particularly for those planning to major in physics. Classical laws of motion: interaction between particles, conservation laws and symmetry principles, rigid body motion, noninertial reference frames, oscillations. Prerequisites: MATH 140 and 141. Students must register for the lecture and the lab. Non-honors students need permission. (General Requirement VI: Physical World)
PHYS 170.301 (lecture)
Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 10:00-11:00
Monday, 2:00-3:00
Tuesday, 11:00-12:00
PHYS 170.302 (laboratory), Wednesday, 1:00-3:00

Constitution Making
William Harris, Associate Professor of Political Science
This is a seminar in constitutional theory that will focus on the problems of creating or restructuring a political order by writing and adopting the design of that order in a set of words contained within a text. The course will have a large component of political and interpretive theory, as well as American political thought. There may be some materials from other constitutional systems besides the United States. However, the course is primarily a way of looking analytically at the founding of the American Constitution by considering how a new constitution would be written, argued for and ratified more than 200 years later—then questioning the nature of its authority. After more than two centuries of experience in interpreting the existing constitutional document, how might a constitution-maker draft a new one to take into account the problems that we have discovered?
Requirement: Extensive reading and active scholarly discussion; one short analytical paper, one medium-length paper; and a final essay examination. This is a General Honors course; however, half of the seats are reserved for students who are not in the General Honors program. (Distribution l: Society)
PSCI 187.301, Tuesday & Thursday, 3:00-4:30

Human Rights
Henry Teune, Professor of Political Science
Global, cross-cultural, and developmental perspectives on the politics of human
rights including their justification, institutionalization, and role in international and
national affairs. (Distribution l: Society)
PSCI 258.301, Monday, Wednesday & Friday, 11:00-12:00

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